Merry Military

May is the month of National Military Apprectiation Month. Now, there is dozens of heavy oscar nominated war dramas (the 40s are naturally filled with them), so I wanted to focus on the lighter side of military movies.

Buck Privates (1941)
Swift and mostly effective. I am not the biggest fan of Abbott and Costello, but they work well interjected in between a more straight forward love story.
Nominated for Best Music, Original Song For the song “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B” and Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture in 1942.

You’ll Never Get Rich (1941)
Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth saves this from being bland. Okay, it is still pretty bland.
Nominated for Best Music, Original SongFor the song “Since I Kissed My Baby Goodbye” and Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture in 1942.

To the Shores of Tripoli (1942)
John Payne’s character must be the biggest asshole in cinema history. Maureen O’Hara falling for him is bullshit. This would have been acceptable if the movie itself was aware of it. It is not.
Nominated for Best Cinematography, Color in 1943.

Captain Newman, M.D. (1963)
I had a hard time getting into this movie. But half way through I got into the groove and enjoyed it. It is at least a half hour too long and could have been trimmed to get a more focused first half.
Nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Bobby Darin), Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium and Best Sound in 1964.

The Last Detail (1973)
The early 70’s Hollywood is just the best. I love these seemingly random slices of life movies. Randy Quaid and his character journey is great.
Nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Jack Nicholson), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Randy Quaid) and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium in 1974.

Private Benjamin (1980)
Goldie Hawn’s character arch is complete forty minutes into the movie, and everything after that is totally uninteresting.
Nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Goldie Hawn), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Eileen Brennan) and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen in 1981.

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