True Crime

Quentin Tarantino’s new film Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is hitting theatres soon, and he like many, many others are cashing in on the true crime fascination that is roaming today. If he is doing it deliberately, I don’t know. I am warming up to his film by watching oscar nominated films based on or inspired by real life murders.

Monster (2003)
Good balance of being sympathetic and appalled by the lead character
Winner of Best Actress in a Leading Role (Charlize Theron) in 2004.

In Cold Blood (1967)
Amazing black and white photography and impressive editing choices.
Nominated for Best Director, Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, Best Cinematography and Best Music, Original Music Score in 1968.

Changeling (2008)
Not as dry as Eastwood’s many other films, but the characters get a bit too characterized.
Nominated for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role (Angelina Jolie), Best Achievement in Cinematography and Best Achievement in Art Direction.

Ghosts of Mississippi (1996)
Well intended, but maybe dedicate a bit more time to Goldberg’s character and the black community instead of sidetracking it.
Nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (James Woods) and Best Makeup in 1997.

I Want to Live! (1958)
Funny enough, I Want to Live has much life to it. Very heave subject matter, but never gets exhausting or too dark.
Winner of Best Actress in a Leading Role (Susan Hayward) in 1959.
Nominated for Best Director, Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, Best Cinematography, Black-and-White, Best Sound and Best Film Editing.

The Black Dahlia (2006)
I was aboard the film for most of the running time, thinking the whole point of the movie was that nothing leads to anything, and about how pointless everything you try to do is. But it turned out it was just a convoluted and silly plot instead. Instead of deliberately being confusing, like Inherent Vice, it was just a straight up mess. I would prefer the nihilistic film I thought it was.
Nominated for Best Achievement in Cinematography 2007.

Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
An episodic hang-out road movie that really defined what the 70s Hollywood would become. Nice.
Winner of Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Estelle Parsons) and Best Cinematography in 1968.
Nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor in a Leading Role (Warren Beatty), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Faye Dunaway), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Gene Hackman), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Michael J. Pollard), Best Director, Best Writing, Story and Screenplay – Written Directly for the Screen and Best Costume Design.

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